Sunday, May 14, 2017

Lavender DRY Mimosa Cocktail Recipe

Lavender DRY Mimosa Cocktail Recipe
A mother who's gone above and beyond to try to teach you to mind your manners and, at the very least, look both ways before you cross the street deserves a drink (or 2) for a job well done. Along with the Mother's Day flowers, breakfast in bed and delicious chocolates, consider whipping up a quick and easy signature Lavender DRY Mom-osa that Mom is sure to love!

Lavender DRY Mimosa Cocktail Recipe

1. Pour orange juice and Prosecco into a chilled champagne flute
2. Get in mom’s good graces and make it freshly squeezed OJ
3. Top with Lavender DRY and garnish with slice of orange peel
4. Make a toast to the woman who raised you (and bask in the glory of your cocktailing skills)!

Plus, mom can sit back and enjoy every sip knowing that DRY Sparkling beverages contain only 45-70 calories and 11-19 grams of sugar per 12 oz. serving!

Remember, it's Mom's special day and she deserves to be treated like the Princess that she is! Go out of your way to make her day special!

Wednesday, May 10, 2017

How Pets Help Reduce Stress

How Pets Help Reduce Stress
Some studies show that people begin to feel less anxious after spending less than an hour with an animal. There are endless benefits from lowering your stress level and while the things that we find stressful in our lives are often hard to eliminate, adding an animal to your life can help.

General Benefits: There's a reason that they say dog is man's best friend. Having a pet, not limited to dogs, is something that everyone should experience at some point in their life. Pets can be calming, mood lifting, empathetic, and so much more. They teach you how to be selfless and responsible as you are caring over another life (for those of you without children). Generally speaking, they make you happy.

Helps with Depression: In some cases, therapists suggest that patients suffering from depression that they adopt a pet. An animal will love you unconditionally and also be a great friend and listener. People with depression often benefit from having a pet, as the animal can help them get out of the house.

Health Benefits: There are other health benefits associated with pet ownership (particularly dogs). Many studies show that owning a pet has a positive impact on cardiovascular disease, hypertension, infection control, allergies, stress related problems, blood pressure, and psychological issues.

Engaged Mind: A key to a healthy mind, especially for those who are elderly, is staying engaged with others. A pet is often a conversation starter and being out with a pet often warrants questions or comments from passersby. Bringing your dog to a dog park is a great way to meet new people with similar interests.

Build Your Children's Confidence: Having a dog in the home can build confidence and manage anxiety and stress in children. Children who struggle with reading or math can gain confidence when reading aloud or reciting multiplication tables to their dog.

Excuse to Play: Training and playing with your dog also provides mental stimulation, helps unleash creativity and alleviates stress. Having a dog will also encourage you to exercise as you'll need to walk Fido regularly.

Routine: Having a daily schedule reduces stress for any individual. Having a dog that relies on you at specific times each day (feeding, walking, and sleeping) can help establish a routine.

Bio: Erin Askeland, CPDT-KA and Training and Behavioral Expert at Camp Bow Wow (North America's largest and most trusted pet care franchise), has offered her insights and tips on the benefits of having a pup and how our furry family members can truly reduce the stress we experience every day.

Saturday, April 22, 2017

5 Phrases to Never Say to The Elderly

5 Phrases to Never Say to The Elderly
Anyone who has ever cared for or spent time with the elderly knows the frustrations that can arise. Simple things that most of us take for granted can turn into monumental tasks that must be repeated over and over again. What are the best ways to handle these situations?

Kurt Kazanowski, an expert in hospice, homecare and working with the elderly, says that while it can be frustrating, especially when it’s someone very close to you like your own parents, there are things you should and should not say that can make it a bit easier:

For example:

- Don’t say: “How can you not remember that!?”
Say instead: “See this sticker? Dad, if the car isn’t inspected before the end of the month, we could have problems.” Place a few post-it notes on the dashboard, fridge and bathroom mirror. Add a smiley face to keep the tone light. And if you still think your parents might forget, make the appointment and then call your dad that morning to remind him.

- Don’t say: “You could do that if you really tried.”
Say instead: “Let me watch and see where you’re having trouble so we can figure out how this can get done together.” Or if you live out of town: “Ask (So-and-so) for help.” Seniors, like everyone else, want to maintain their independence. But if a project is truly beyond their capabilities and they either don’t know anyone who could help (or won’t ask), you might want to try to find someone who can lend a hand.

- Don’t say: “I just showed you how to use the remote control yesterday.”
Instead say: “The blue button on top turns the TV on and there’s one set of arrows for changing the channel and another for the volume. I’ll show you again.” Better yet — ask your parents’ cable or satellite provider to recommend a senior-friendly remote control with a simple design, or purchase one at a local electronics store. Or if they’re okay following instructions, you could write or print out step-by-step directions in large, legible type and leave it near the remote.

- Don’t say: “What does that have to do with what we’re talking about?”
Say instead: “I was telling you about the game last night. It’s okay if you want to chat about something else.” If the subject is important to you, try to bring the conversation back on track without pointing a finger at your dad. And to avoid suppressing genuine anger or sadness, gently explain why the conversation was important to you. Another option: Say nothing and just listen.

- Don’t say: “You already told me that.”
Say instead: “No kidding? And don’t tell me that the next thing you did was . . . .” Yes, you can make a joke out of it — but only if your parents won’t feel hurt. Best-case scenario: Your mom or dad will feel amused and relaxed enough to join in.