Saturday, October 14, 2017

Apple Melon Juice Recipe

I love this time of the year when apples are being harvested and in abundance here in the northeast. I like to go to our local Farmer's Market and pick up 2-3 bushels of apples to make some homemade apple pies, applesauce, bread, use them in homemade juice recipes and in other apple-flavored goodies. Apples are good for our bodies and it's really easy to incorporate them into our daily diets.
Apple Melon Juice Recipe

Today's guest post recipe is courtesy of HUROM.

Apple Melon Juice Recipe

1 and 1/4 cup of melon cubes
2/3 cups of fresh apple chunks
1/2 cup of bok choy
1/2 cup of sliced celery

Using a peeler, peel the melon’s rind. Wash celery and bok choy and remove seeds from apple. Cut into appropriate sizes. Insert the ingredients into your juicer by alternating their order. Enjoy! Pour over ice if desired.

Wednesday, September 20, 2017

Healthy Vitamin H: A Biotin Briefing for Healthy Hair, Skin and Nails

What is biotin and why do I need it?
Biotin, commonly referred to as Vitamin H or Vitamin B-7, is a complex B vitamin that assists your body in converting food to fuel by helping to break down protein and fat. Apart from its crucial role in energy consumption, biotin is vital for healthy hair, skin, and nails as well as the nervous system and liver. Biotin is a key nutrient for a healthy pregnancy and is found in many prenatal vitamins to support embryonic growth.

Biotin also plays in important role in:

Blood sugar regulation, 
Maintaining healthy LDL cholesterol, and
Adrenal function

Your hair, skin, and nails are made of a very tough protein called keratin, which is a type of protein built from the cell reaction between enzymes and biotin.  Beauty products containing biotin are becoming increasingly popular to nurture thinning hair, promote healthy skin, and maintain strong nails. Biotin may also be effective in repairing scarring and damage caused by acne.

How can I recognize a biotin deficiency?
While naturally occurring within your body, biotin is water-soluble, meaning the body is unable to store it.  Bacteria found in your intestine produces biotin, but there is little evidence about how much of that biotin your body can absorb.  There is some evidence that a long-term use of antibiotics or eating raw egg whites can cause biotin deficiency.

Biotin deficiency is rare, but presents itself in the form of dry skin, brittle hair and nails, hair loss, issues within the nervous system, fatigue, and digestion problems.

How can I get more biotin?
A healthy diet can supply a daily serving of biotin. Foods like almonds, mushrooms, eggs, salmon, sweet potatoes, and spinach all contain biotin in different measures. However, many people struggle to consume the recommended amount every day.  This is where falling back on a supplement or multivitamin containing biotin and other antioxidants becomes efficient and convenient.

I really like Vitafusion Gorgeous Hair, Skin, & Nails- it¹s a delicious gummy multivitamin that contains 5000 mcg Biotin and powerful antioxidants Vitamin C & E essential for the body¹s production of collagen (a protein that works hand-in-hand with biotin).  It also contains zinc, a mineral that plays a crucial role in healthy skin cell division and reproduction, and folic acid which works to generate new cells and tissues in the body, Taking a supplement daily for at least 3 months is recommended to have an effective response in visibly healthier hair, skin, and nails. 

Dr. Jonny Bowden, also known as The Nutrition Myth Buster, is a nationally known expert on weight loss and health, and has been seen on Dr. Oz, the Doctors, and every major television network. He is the best-selling author of 15 books, including his latest book, The 150 Healthiest Foods on EarthLiving Low Carb, The Great Cholesterol Myth, and Smart Fat: Eat More Fat Lose More Weight Get Healthy Now!

Wednesday, September 6, 2017

5 Fitness Tips Every Teen and their Parent Should Read

There’s a lot of good reasons for teens to engage in exercising regularly and stay fit. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports that students who are physically active tend to have better grades, that higher physical fitness levels are associated with improved cognitive performance, and that those who participate in physical activities have fewer disciplinary problems. Add to that the fact that they will be laying the foundation for a healthy lifestyle and creating great habits, and it’s a great deal all around. Yet many teens and their parents have questions about fitness that may be holding them back.

“The benefits of being a fit teen are plentiful, but it’s important to also know how to help reduce injury risks and stay motivated over the long haul,” explains Coach Sarah Walls, personal trainer and owner of SAPT Strength & Performance Training, Inc., who is also the strength and conditioning coach for WNBA’s Washington Mystics. “Being fit and healthy is more than just exercising, so it’s a good idea to learn more about what you need to do to be healthy all around.”
5 Fitness Tips Every Teen and their Parent Should Read

Here are 5 fitness tips every teen should read:

1. Eat brain food. This is the good stuff, which is the unprocessed, whole foods, which include things like salads, poultry, lean meats, eggs, healthy fats, etc. Unprocessed foods are packed with vitamins and nutrients that will keep you sharp mentally and physically fit, too.

2. Train to be more useful. Going to the gym to work on your "abs" and "beach muscles" is usually done with endless sit-ups and biceps curls, but you can get the same effect by training to be more athletic, faster, and generally more useful in life, which means working to get your entire body stronger. You can work with a personal trainer to put together a routine that meets these needs and goals that are tailored specifically for you.

3. Go into Do Not Disturb mode. A big part of mental fitness is the ability to step away from the phone calls, texts, and Instagram feeds. Your mind will keep you feeling better when you walk away from those things more often. Take some time to go for a walk or spend time playing with your dog, as these kinds of things are good for your body and your mind.

4. Appreciate that nothing happens overnight. When embarking on a fitness routine, it helps to celebrate the small victories that come with the little daily improvements. Yes, you may want to get a big bench press or increase your vertical jump by several inches - both are worthy pursuits, but both also take time and dedication. Learn to love the small changes and watch how they lead to meeting big goals.

5. Beware of the changes. Fitness has changed a lot in 20 years, so be careful whose advice you take. There are plenty of well-intended coaches and parents who dole out advice that is at best antiquated and at worst downright dangerous. Listen to your body, ask questions, and seek out expert advice when you need it!

“The teen years are a great time to work on fitness and for laying the foundation for a healthy body and future,” added Coach Walls. “The more you know about what it takes, the less you are looking for an overnight fix. Getting fit, whether you are a teen or a senior citizen, takes time, patience, and dedication. But it’s worth it!”

Sarah Walls has over 15 years experience in coaching and personal training. Owner of SAPT Strength & Performance Training, Inc, founded in 2007, she offers coaching to develop athletes, adult programs, team training, online coaching, and more. She is also the strength and conditioning coach for the WNBA’s Washington Mystics, and has over eight years of experience working as an NCAA D1 strength and conditioning coach and personal trainer. To learn more, visit the site: www.saptstrength.com.